Skip to main content

About your Search

20121002
20121010
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)
or became. um, the big issue, the big change began in 1980, of course, with the election of ronald reagan because ronald reagan brought with him to washington, um, a very underrated figure in recent american history, someone who i don't think gets his due as an important person, and that's edwin meese. because edwin meese at first as an adviser and then as attorney general said, look, there has been a liberal ayen da at the supreme court -- agenda at the supreme court, there needs to be a conservative agenda at the supreme court. what was that agenda? expand executive power, end racial preferences intended to assist african-americans, speed up execution, welcome religion into the public sphere and, above all, um, reverse roe v. wade and allow states once again to ban abortion. a big part of the reagan revolution, um, was the arrival in washington of a group of young and committed conservative lawyers who wanted to work in that, on behalf of that agenda. who were two of the best and brightest of that group? john roberts and samuel alito. 197 finish -- in 1985 in a memo plotting litigation
to the scene in phoenix in 1960's during the election when william rehnquist was interviewing with voters and brosnahan said look -- he was a very well-known and respected lawyer by thin in san francisco and brosnahan said i was there and i was the fbi agent on the scene. i positively identify him as the man. discouraging black voters. rehnquist was giving them a literacy test and which was not illegal but it was, but he was really pushing the line to the point where the police and the fbi had to be called to restore order. and rehnquist simply said, that was not made. >> host: kind of a case of mistaken identity so james brosnahan comes to washington and puts a lot on the line. >> guest: puts a lot on the line and really just kind it gets hammered because in the end he is not left with anything that really he can grab onto to come back at rehnquist. rehnquist simply says i just can't explain it. it's just not me and that was very i thought, very typical i think of when i met with rehnquist's 10 years later. very very typical of the way that he carried a question that he did not want to a
in the 1960s during the election when william rehnquist was interfering with voters. and brosnahan said, look, he was a very well known and respected lawyer by then in san francisco. and buzz han said, i was there, i was the fbi agent on the -- >> host: who was discouraging black voters. >> guest: rehnquist was giving them a literacy test. >> host: right. >> guest: and, um, which was not illegal, but it was -- but he was really pushing the line to the point where the police and the fbi had to be called to restore order. and rehnquist simply said, that not me. >> host: kind of a mistaken identity. >> guest: case of mistaken identity. >> host: so james brosnahan comes to washington, puts a lot on the line -- >> guest: puts a lot on the line and really gets hammered because in the end he's not left with anything that really he can grab onto to come back at rehnquist. rehnquist simply says i just can't explain it, t just not me -- it's just not me. and that was very, very, i thought, cagey. it was very typical, i thought, when i met with rehnquist ten years later, um, very, very typical of the wa
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)